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Full text of "Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (1891)"

REPORT 



OF THE 




t of Pic lis 



STATE OF FLORIDA, 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



SEPTEMBER 30TH, 1891 



F370s 
R611 




ANNUAL REPORT 

— OP — 

ALBERT J. HUSSELL, 

Superintendent of Public Instruction, 

— FOB THE — 

SCHOOL YEAR ENDING SEPT. 30, 1891. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Superintendent of Public Instruction. 



Office op the 
State Superintendent of Pubho Instruction, 
Tallahassee, Dec. 30th, 1891. 



•J 



To his Excellency y Governor F. P., Fleming .- 

Sib — I have the honor to comply with the requirements 
of the law, and submit my annual report of the Department 
of Public Instruction of the State of Florida for the yeai- 
1890-1891, ending September 30th, 1891. 

Very respectfully yours, 

ALBERT J. RUSSELL, 
State Superintendent Public Instruction. 



REPORT. 

Continued success and advance characterize the public 
schools of the State in every county. The people are alive 
to the importance of the work, and properly value the privi- 
leges and opportunities afforded, and are using them to the 
greatest advantage. 

Improvement, wherever possible, iB the manifest spirit 
everywhere, as to patrons, school officers, teachers and pupils. 
The number of schools continue to steadily increase at the de- 
mand of the people and the growth and increase of the pop- 
ulation. 

The interest on the part of the patrons of the schools, 
the parents and guardians of the youth is Btill increasing, 
which largely tends to the benefit and success of the schools, 



and impresses favorably both teacher and pnpil with the 
responsibility and importance of their work. 

IQCTPMSNT. 

Steadily does the improvement in school houses, furni- 
ture and general equipments, aad appliances and facilities, 
advance with the growth and popularity of the system, so 
that the work of the teacher and the pupil is made more 
cheerful and lovable, and the school bouse and grounds have 
their attractions, drawing upon the affections and enlisting 
the pride of all interested, instead ot, as in the past, repelling 
and becoming a place of dread and sombre endurance. 

* INCREASE. 

The number of schools has been increased fifteen during 
the year, making the number operated during the year 2,343; 
the number of teachers has been accordingly increased 131, 
making the number now employed in the State 2,641. 
The enrollment of pupils has increased proportionately, and 
the daily attendance has largely increase'!, and the public 
school work and spirit may be truthfully said to be fully 
alive to the importance of every feature of the enterprise, and , 
doubtless with such fostering care as the" State is certainly 
called upon to give her schools, improvement and advance- 
ment upon all lines will continue until the State will move 
abreast with the foremost of the States of the Union in the 
near future. 

BBSULTS. 

It is difficult to state or calculate the result of this work 
if faithfully prosecuted upon the intelligence, virtue 
and refinement of the people in suet* eding generations. One 
thing is beyond doubt or cavil, there is now no reason why 
the children of to-day, every one, may not receive sufficient 
education as to make them intelligent citizens, capable of ap- 
preciating good government and lovers of order and peace; for 
the very poorest have the school house near their door, with- 
out price, and the opportunity is extended to the higher 
branches of learning, equally free and without price. School 
officers and teachers, warmly seconded by the people, have 
resolved that ignorance and illiteracy shall be driven from 
our border*, and virtue, intelligence and good order reign 
instead. 

school paorEKTY. 

The value of school sites and buildings has very largely 
increased during the past ten years. For the yeur 1891 the 
State Superintendent reported the value of school buildings 






to be $89,868 ; for the year 1891 it is my pleasure to report 
the same value at $497,240,07, Bhowing afl increase of value 
to the amount of $407,381.07. This is oue of the best evi- 
dences oi the permanent growth and establishment of interest 
is the public school system. 

COMPAB1SON O* YEARS. 

1889- "BO. 1890-"B1. Laercue. 

Number of schools, 2,333 2,348 15 

Number of white schools, 1,746 1,747 

Number negro schools, 587 601 

Number teachers employed, 2,510 2,641 131 

Number white teachers, 1,849 1,956 107 

Number negro teachers, 661 685 24 

FINANCIAL. 

Amount tax raised by counties, 1891, . . $450,334 43 
Amount tax raised by counties, 1890, . . 399,755 56 

Increase of 1891 over 1890, . . . $50,578 87 

Amount apportioned proceeds sales of land for 

the year 1891, $33,970 22 

Amount apportioned from the constitutional tax 

of one mill, 80,000 00 

Amount county tax, 1891, .... $450,334 43 
Amount land proceeds, 1891, . . . . 33,970 22 
Amount one mill tax, 1891, . . . 80,000 00 



Total expenditure for common schools, 1891, $564,304 65 
Total expenditure for common schools, 1890, 516,532 70 

Increase over 1890, $47,771 95 

Taking the entire population of the State to be 400,000, and 
the number of schools 2,348, it will give a school opened and 
operated for every 170 of the people. 

COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS. 

These high schools are being inaugurated and highly suc- 
cessfully operated in the counties, and wherever they are in- 
stituted are doing an excellent work, very gratifying to the 
patrons, and affording an opportunity for advanced education, 
which many of our youth would never have without them. 
The course of study in these schools is designed to be very 
practical, fitting the student for practical life, in whatever 
business vocation he may pursue. 



6 

We claim that an equity prevails in this idea of county 
high schools, for white the principle that underlies the public 
school 'System is that the State should fit her citizenship for 
the duties and responsibilities she imposes upon them, and 
that in doing this she compels ihe rich to pay largely for the 
poor, and the prosperous for the adversely situated, it is but 
right and just, thr»t the large taxpayer should have the op- 
portunity of completing liisKfhildren'-- education at least as for 
as the high school course, without being compelled to extra 
expense of payi g for it; elsewhere, and is provided for in 
these county high schools. Happily for the people of Flori- 
da they can go mrther in the education of their youths with- 
out cost of tuition through a college tducation in the colleges, 
seminaries and normil school*, which are as free to the peo- 
ple as are the common schools, and these comity high schools 
are preparatory To an entrance into the college classes. 

GRADED SCHOOL*. 

The schools are being thoroughly graded throughout the 
State, which is greatly improving tLe rytketa and work. The 
grades at present are eight in number, embracing a common 
school cours>- of spelling, reading, writing', arithmetic, gram- 
mar, U. S. history, geography, composition and elementary 
physiology, with special reference to ti e elf cts of alcoholic 
stimulants and narcotics upon the human character and sys 
tern. The pupil entering at ibe legal school ag- of'G 3 P ears, 
has eight years in this course, finishing at the age of U years 
prepared to < .-r upon the high school course of 4 years, or 
if compelled to enter he ranks of the bread winners, he is fit- 
ted for the ordinary educational demands of his sphere of life 
and besides holds the key that unlocks the store house of 
knowledge to his unstinted d is ires and aims. , 

It is the purpose of the State Board of Education, in ad- 
dition to the above, to press the effort at manual training as 
fur as practicable, so that all the youths of the State may par- 
take of this useful, and, to the large majority of them, so es- 
sential knowledge. 

STATE INSTITUTIONS, 

The educational institutions of the State are as follows: 
The Florida Agricultural an. I Mechanical College and Exper- 
imental Station, located at Lake City; ihe West Floiida 
Seminary located at Tallahassee ; The East Florida Seminary 
located at Gainesville ; The State Normal and Business Col- 
lege located at DeFuniak Springs ; The Florida Normal and 
Industrial College for negro pupils located at Tallahassee, and 
the Deaf Mute and Bliml Institute located at St. Augustine- 

Of these the Institute for the Blind and Deaf Mutes and 



the Florida State Normal and Business College at DeFuniak 

Springs are supported and maintained solely by appropria- 
tions made by the Legislature of the State. The Florida 
Normal and Industrial College for negro students in part by 
appropriation from the State annually, but largely by a con- 
gressional appropriation known as the Morrill Bill fund ; The 
seminaries are mainly supported by the proet eds of sales of 
the lands granted by the United States, and special appropria- 
tions by the State. The West Florida Seminary is also a 
beneficiary of a bequest made by tbe late Judge j. P. West- 
cott of Tallahassee. These schools are each excellent insti- 
tutions of learning, having excellent faculties, and are well 
equipped for their respective work. 

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE. 

This institution is located at Lake City, in the fertile and 
thriving county- of Columbia, whose people are widely known 
for their generous hospitality, refinement and virtue, and its 
excellent health. Its faculty consists of nine members, em- 
bracing the chairs of political economy and logic, rallit try sci- 
ence, tactics and civil engineering; physics and ch 
mathematics, English language and literature, manual train- 
ing, Latin and history, and biology and natural s. icnce. 

It will be seen that ihi* college, while it proposes to ^ive 
a thorough college and literary course, will also devote time 
and energy in giving a full and intelligent course of instruc- 
tion In wood and metal work, in industrial training and agri- 
culture, theoretical and practical. It thus aims the 
demands of the intensely practical age in which wt are living 
and the thoroughly practical country of jrble i are citi- 
zensA Tuition is free, and the study of the Board f Trustees 
antff acuity is to reduce other unavoidable expenw - to a min- 
imum. 

I take pleasure in r fening to the statement below com- 
ing from the President of the college, Prof. .1'. L. Kern : 

State AutiicuLTtniAL College, 1 

Lake City, Fi a , December 30, 1391. \ 

Mori. Albert J. Rusarfl, Slate •Superinfen'knt Public instruc- 
tion, T'lltokaxsee, Fla „■ 

Sir — Replying to your request for a brief sketch of the 
Florida Agricultural College, giving its present condition 
and work in outline, I have the "honor of submitting the fol- 
lowing : 

The Agricultural and Mechanical College as it is prpu- 
larly styled, is now in its eighth year. It is supported by an 



8 

annual income from the general government of about $18,- 
000. The organization is complete and systematic, providing 
for a two-years' preparatory course and four-year colle- 
giate courses as follows : An agricultural course, (recently 
shortened to three years) ; a mechanical course ; a classical 
and scientific course and a civil engineering course. Each of 
these courses lead to an appropriate degree. The govern- 
ment of students is a wholesome form of military discipline 
under the charge of Lieut. C. C. Ballon, Sixteenth United 
States Infantry, who is a graduate of the United States Mil- 
itary academy at West Point, The Board of Trustees con- 
sists of ten of the leading citizens of the State, all of whom 
are highly educated and occupy prominent official and social 
positions. The State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
the State Treasurer and the State Commissioner of Agricul- 
ture are ex-offlcio members of this board. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Hon. A. J. Russell, Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion and ex-oflicio President, Tallahassee. 

Hon. L. B. Wombwell, Secretary. Tallahassee. 

Hon. Patrick Houbtoun, of Leon, Tallahassee. 

Hon. James E. Young, of Columbia, Lake City. 

Hon. H. W. Long, of Marion, Marcel. 

Hon. J. N". C. Stockton, of Duval, Jacksonville. 

Gen. W. D* Barnes, of Jackson, Mananna. 

Hon. J. W. Trammels, of Polk, Lakeland. 

Major C. H. Smith, of Madison, Madison. 

Hon. E. J. Triat, of Duval, ex-offioio Treasurer, Talla- 
hassee. 

The faculty is as follows : 

F. L. Kern, A. M., President, Political Economy and 
Logic. 

Lieut. Charles C. Ballod, 16th Infantry U. S. Army, 
Commandant of Cadets, Military Science, Tactics and Civil 
Engineering. 

J. N. Whisneb, A. M-, Department of Agriculture, The- 
oretical and Practical. 

J. M. Pickel, A. M., Ph. D., Department of Physics and 
Chemistry. 

H. P. Bay a, (Virginia Military Institute), Department 
of Mathematics, 

W. W. Seals, A. M-, Department of English Language 
and Literature. 

H. C. Powers, Department of Manual Training, E. J. 
Bending, Assistant in Manual Training. 



9 

J. M. Stuaet, A. B., Department of Latin and History, 

Frank W. Piokell, A. B., M. S,, Department of Biology 
and Natural Science. 

A. W. Bitting, Veterinary Science. 

J. C. Martin, Je., A. M., Principal Sub-collegiate De- 
partment. 

D, L. McSwaih, L. I., Assistant Sub-collegiate Depart- 
ment. 

J. Franklin Appbll, M. D., College Physician. 

J, E. Futch, Librarian. 

W. H. Pebry, Steward. 

These gentleman were alt especially educated for the pO; 
sitions they occupy and have had years of experience in their 
chosen work. Each is a competent and devoted master of his 
department and does work that wilt compare favorably with 
any college of the kind in the South. There are six college 
buildings all equipped and adapted to the work of the various 
departments, dormitory and boarding. For applied work in 
agriculture, fertile land, tools, seeds and fertilizers are pro- 
vided, and careful instruction furnished all who apply for this 
course. The mechanic art hall is equipped with machinery, 
tools and material for wood work and work in metals, 

The chemical and physical laboratory has an outfit of ap- 
paratus valued at several thousand dollars. The museum cost 
over two thousand dollars and represents a comprehensive 
collection for the use of students studying natural history 
and biology. The library has nearly three thousand dollars' 
worth of well-selected reference books and encyclopedias and 
a file of nearly all the newspapers published in the State, 

Of the 105 students enrolled thus far this session, about 
a Score have either been dismissed for failure in discipline or 
in studies or have withdrawn for reasons of their own. About 
one-half are in the preparatory department but notwithstand- 
ing this fact, it is still true that a much larger number of 
young men are in the collegiate courses than are found in any 
other college in the State. Considering the age of the col- 
lege and the population of the State, we have as large an at- 
tendance as any similar college in the South. Medicine and 
medical attendance are furnished free of charge, but there is 
very little sickness at the college this year. 

The matriculation fee is $4 per term, which entitles the 
student to fuel and furnished room. Text books are furnished 
on a rental plan. Board is $10 per month. The annual cost 
per student, including a good uniform, is less than $125 per 
session of nine months. 



10 

The class of students now in attendance 'is an improve- 
ment over those of previous years in the matter of interest 
and progress, and tenacity and general ability. This mny be 
due to the better disciplinary management, and the closer 
classification of all grades. 

The esprit decorps is far better than formerly, and a 
rather better moral tone prevails among the higher grades of 
students, some of whom have radically reformed their ways 
since coming here, and all sh..w great improvement. 

The unwise and unpatriotic policy ou the part of some of 
sending their sons to other states to be educated, is without 
excuse now that a home institution so well merits the patron- 
age of all. Respectfully, 

F. L. Kebs, 

President. 

WE6T FLOEID.Y SKlflMARY. 

TLis excellent school is situated at the Capital City of 
the Stare, on beautiful grounds, and lias just occupied its 
new building, an imposing and commodious edifice, modelled 
in modern adaptabilities to school use, and supplied with all 
nesceseary convenience* and facilities. 

It has an excellent Faculty, is well equipped and expects 
xpeedily to enlarge the appliances, library and other aids and 
helps ; tuition is free, hoard reasonable, and there should be in 
attendance upon tins excellent institution at least three 
hundred students; both sexes are admitted into the *ame 
courses of study and a lady of rare qualifications is a member 
of the Faculty. 

I take pleasure in inserting the following letter from its 
President, Col. G. M. Edgar: 

JTallauassee Fl.i., December 30, 1881. 
Son. A. J. Busaell, Stale Superintendent of Publk- Instruction: 
Dear Sir — In response to your request t" me to give a 
brief statement of the condition of this institution, I beg 
leave to report that the work done in the past year has been 
as strong as in any previous year of my administration, and I 
trust will be followed by as good results. Though the high 
standard which has been maintained has had a tendency to 
eliminate pupils who are not ambitious to become scholars, 
the patron;) ge has been very fair — the number of pupils in at- 
tendance having averaged ab^ut seventy-five sii.ee my last 
annual report. In June last five young men and two young 
ladies were graduated with the degree of A. B. They are the 
first full graduates the institution has turned out. Desiring 
to make this the Literary and Classical college of the State , 



11 

we have not trenched upon the sphere of the Agricultural and 
Mechanical college by* teaching scientific, industrial and 
technical conrBes, but have sought rather to unite with 
thorough instruction in English, Latin, Greek, the modem 
languages and Mathematics as liberal training in the Physical 
and Mental Sciences, Political Economy, History and Civics, 
as can profitably be given in six years. It may be justly claimed 
that the institution has gained a vantage ground which, if held, 
will ensure to it a wide sphere of usefulness at no distant 
day. It offers the youth of the State a complete literary 
course free of charge for tuition. Its location is unsurpassed 
for healthfulness. It is surrounded by a community of refined 
people. The new building recently completed, is one of tliu 
most beautiful and commodious school buildings in the State, 
affording ample study halls, Ucture rooms and laboratories 
for the purposes of instruction. Students of both sexes may 
obtain board in private families - at reasonable rates. Talla- 
hassee is easy of access, too, from both the Eastern and 
"Western portions of the State.' 

With these and other opportunities fur culture offered to 
them by the State, it wnuld seem that even youth of moder- 
ate means are without excuse if they do not secure a suitable 
training far their life work. Again invoking your aid in the 
effort to extend the usefulness of the institution, 

I am respectfully, 

Geo. M. Edgar. 

THE BAST FLOBrbA SEMI VARY 

Is located in the ln-art of the ppninsular portion o! the State, 
in the city of Gainesville, full of life, push at id healthful 
growth, calculated to stimulate the youih to great activity and 
to awak" his :■ Dilution to noble purposes. 

The discipline of the seminary is military, and military 
science and tactics are taught and make a principal feature, 
developing both a fine physical and an honorable manhood. 
Its literary and business curriculum are both of an advanced 
character," and the seminsry is highly appreciated by its pa- 
trons, the people of the district east of the Suwannee river, 
while there are students annunlly from several Stales of the 
Union. 

It has a line seminary building, barracks and campus, and 
is well prepared to do the work, laid out in its annnual cata- 
logues. Its President, Col K. P. Cater, writes as ful'owa of 
its work of the present yea 



IS 

* East Florida Seminary, > 

Gainesville, Fla., December 30, 1891. f 

Major A. J. Russell, State Superintendent Public Instruction, 
Tallahassee, Flo. .■ 

My Dear Sir— In accordance with your request 1 here- 
with hand you brief notes of the work done at the seminary 
during the year 1891. 

With kind regards and best wishes, I am, 
Very truly yours, 

Edwin P. Cater, 
Superintendent E. F. S. 

During the year 1891 there has been in attendance at 
East Florida Seminary students from twenty-three counties 
of Florida, and from seven other States. 

The work done by the students is of the most practical 
and helpful character, as is evidenced by the ease with which 
the graduates secure lucrative positions of all sorts, and by 
the satisfactory manner in which they conduct and sustain 
themselves in those positions. 

In May, 1891, twelve young men and one young lady 
were awarded diplomas by the seminary, and of this number 
several are doing good work in the public schools of the State, 
and others hive secured good positions as book-keepers in 
banking and other business houses. 

In addition to the ordinary curriculum, the students have 
the opportunity of thorough training in type-writing and ste- 
nography. 

The teachers are excellent in their several departments 
and are doing earnest and successful work. 

The mess-hall is in excellent bands and the students are 
entirely satisfied with the fare provided them. 

The cost of attendance at the seminary is very moderate. 

THE FLORIDA STATS NORMAL COLLEGE. 

This excellent school is situated at DeFuniak Springs, 
in Walton county, West Florida, a locality famed for its ex- 
cellent health and the character of its people. The work of 
this institution is, as its title tells, to prepare young men and 
women to teach in the public schools of the Stale. It is sup- 
ported by the State and like all the schools in Florida oper- 
ated by public funds, is free of tuition charges. 

The course of study embraces two years' work and there 
are two classes, the junior and senior. 

The junior class are in the following studies : rhetoric and 
composition, general history, mathematics, Latin, physics, 
drawing. 



13 



The senior class are in the following : English literature, 
history and e^say writing, Latin, mathematics, chemistry, 
physics, astronomy, drawing, and civil government and Flor- 
ida school lawg. 

It was hoped that many students would be fully prepared 
in public schools to enter freely upon this coarse, but iu this 
the faculty have been disappointed and it has be come neces- 
sary to add an Academic Department, in which students are re- 
viewed or prepared in the following course : English grammar, 
geography, United States history, arithmetic, penmanship and 
drawing, elocution and dictation and book-keeping, embrac- 
ing the work of one school year. 

For the maintenance of discipline the college relies prin- 
cipally upon appeals to the moral sense of the students. No 
student who is insensible to such appeals will be permitted to 
remain in the institution. 

The governing board consists of the Governor of the 
State, who is president. The State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, who is secretary. The Secretary of State, the At- 
torney-General and State Treasurer. The diplomas ot this col- 
lege constitute life State certificates 

i take pleasure in inserting the following letter from the 
President, Prof. H. Noel Felkel : 

DeFuniak Springs, Fla., December 30, 1891. 

Hon. A. J. Russell, State Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, Thllakassee, Fla. : 

Sib — I have the honor to submit the following as a re- 
port of the State Normal College located at this place : 

The attendance for the present scholastic year has, all 
things considered, been most encouraging, for 'while the total 
number enrolled is not so great as last year, the daily average 
has been better than at any oi her period in the his »ory of the 
institution. At this time twelve counties are represented in the 
school. I am satisfied, however, that with more extensive ad- 
vertising it would be possible to have students from every 
county in the State and it is hoped that the legislature in mak- 
ing future appropriations to the college will provide for the 
expense of advertising in such manner that the people of the 
whole State may be informed as to the advantages offered by 
this school. 

Notwithstanding the growth of the institution and the 
consequent increased demands for a larger appropriation, the 
last legislature did not grant as much as was allowed in pre- 
vious years, and it is easy to understand that we are greatly 



14 

hampered iu oar efforts to make the school as successful as 
we had wished. But we are nevertheless doing most excel- 
lent work, work that must ultimately have a very great influ- 
ence in the educational development of the State. Our stu- 
dents show themselves thoroughly interested in their studies 
and it may truthfully be said that the spirit of the school is 
one of industry and earnest effort. 

The school is provided with a commodious dormitory, so 
that we have been able to provide accommodations for all 
students that came to us from abroad. The minimum board 
at the dormitory is ten dollars per calendar month. Many 
students, however, bos rd themselves at a much lower rate. 

The apparatus — chemical, physical, mathematical and as- 
tronomical — is in good condition, and though not so complete 
as it should be, we are enabled with the pieces provided to il- 
lustrate many of the most important scientific truths. It is 
a fair estimate to value the apparatus belonging to the school 
at six hundred dollars. 

The buildings, consisting of the dormitory, the president's 
residence and the college building proper, are all in good con- 
dition and all insured against loss by fire. 

The total valne of the property belonging to the school, 
including buildings, furniture and apparatus, is seven thou- 
sands dollars. Respectfully submitted, 

H. N. F ELK EL. 

THE FLORIDA NORMAL \N!i INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE. 

This i« a college for colored youth of both sexes who de- 
.. to be prepared for teaching in the public fchools for the 
>OUth of their race, was founded by the State in 1887, and is 
supported by annual appropriations made by the legislature ; 
it has since become the recipient of one-half the amount ap- 
propriated by congress under what is known as the Morrill 
Bill, beginning with $15,000.00 and increasing each succeed- 
ing year $1,000 00 until the appropriation shall reach the sum 
of $25,000.00 when the fund becomes permanent at that sum. 
1 1; it is an academic department, a normal department, 
an agricultural department, and an industrial training 
department. It is situated upon one of the commanding 
hills surrounding the city of Tallahassee and sloping back to 
the woodlands to the South ; has an ample farm area, fruit 
groves, a college building, an industrial training and labora- 
tory building and commodious dormitory and barns. The 
Farm is supplied with all modern implements and labor sav- 
ing machines ; the laboratory with chemicals and appliances, 
and the industrial training building with tools, implements, 



15 

lathes, and steam power, thus being amply ana excellently 
equipped for its important work ; it has a large library of prae 
tical books of reference, history, encyclopedias, etc. 

THE DESIGN 

Is to prepare the students who enter to go out Ed to the 
field of teaching prepared to teach the books, and lrerary 
knowledge, and also be thoroughly enabled to give instruction 
in tool eraft, and trade work, practical, economical farming, 
the dairy, and care of Stock. Every male student, is required 
to take the course in theoretical and practical farming in the 
school and field, and barn, and every female the course so far 
as the farm housewifery goerfn the agricultural course and in 
the dairy from the udder to the creamery and butter making 5 
in the general laundry, mangling department, and house- 
keeping, and the abiding hope for this institution is that 
Florida will have in the very near future teachers to the ma- 
nor born, of the negro race, who shall be able to teach the 
young a practical, and thorough training fitting them for the 
more essentia and useful avenues of life. 

The following letter from the president will give further 
information : 

Tallahassee, Fla., December 30, 1891. 

Hon. A. J. Bu&sell, State Superintendent Public Instruction, 
Tallahassee, Fla. : 

Sir — I beg leave to submit the following report relative 
to the Florida State Normal and Industrial College for col- 
ored studente : 

At the close of the last session, the institution was re 
moved from its original location on College Hill to "High- 
wood," a fine and commanding site overlooking Tallahns-ee. 
A princely manor house, a fine type of the mansion of ante 
beUum days, crowns the apex of the hill on which the building 
is situated ; ancient massive oaks, gnarled in branch and stem 
and festooned with moss, rare shrubs, graceful plants and ex- 
quisite flowers render the spot just su -h an one as ih • fancy 
might well picture as the retreat t r > which the Gods of classic 
mythology were wont to resort fur council and merriment. 
The manor house, with its spacious rooms anri halls, is used 
for recitations and girls' dormitories. A hall for the mechan- 
ic arts, seventy-two by thirty-six feet, is situated west of the 
manor house ; twenty by ten feet of it is reserved for a labor- 
atory. West of the hall are barns ; south of these is the boys' 
dormitory building. With the exception of the main struc 
ture and the bamB, the two other buildings and all substantial 



16 






improvements on the grounds have been made since the school 
took possession of the premises on the 28th May, 1891, 

The magnificent and handsome manor house and the other 
houses harmonizing therewith, the lovely grounds, the pictur- 
esque scenery of hill and dale rising in gentle succession until 
lost in the haze of the distant horizon — all these have had 
their marked effect in making the institution still more pop- 
ular with, and attractive to the race for whom it was founded . 

Oar registered enrollment is sixty-eight, and were the 
terms of admission unrestricted as to age and scholarship, 
we should soon be overcrowded ; as it is, it is not likely that 
we shall be able to accommodate at least all the female appli- 
cants with board and lodging next year. Our mechanical de- 
partment was formally opened the latter part of November* 
owing to the late arrival of the tools. These implements of 
industry are of the very latest and most approved patterns. 
I do not think I hazard too much in saying that our mechan- 
ical department is one of the best, if not the best equipped in 
a school of this kind in the South. Both the novelty of hand- 
ling, and the acquisition of knowledge in the use or tools, 
serve as strong incentives with the boys in this line of our op- 
erations. Many already display taste, while all show com- 
mendable progress. When the engine, which is now being set 
in place, i-hall have been put in operation, as a motor power, 
we shall feel like indulging in a bit of pride in feeling that we 
are fairly on tiie road to produce teachers for the State of 
Florida, armed and equipped in brain and brawn to train their 
youthful charges aright. 

K During the summer, we raised an abundance of three va- 

rieties of millet, grain and fodder com, peas, sweet potatoes, 
and bay, by far more than is needed for our wants. With the 
exception of the corn, due to french, which came out during 
cultivation, all our experiments of every kind proved success- 
ful. We are at present experimenting on an arctic grass from 
which we expect good results, as a winter feed for stock. 

All we have accomplished within a year since the removal 
of the institution to "HiLihwood" would seem to point to hap- 
pier results in the future, both for the colored race and for the 
agricultural and other industrial interests of Florida. 

Our normal school work, the chief objective end of the 
school, grows steadily in interest and success. The first 
graduating class will go out into the world with the close of 
the session, the forerunners, we trust, of many similar bodies- 
to follow. 



IT 

With thanks to Providence for achievements had, thus 
far, and with a strong abiding faith in con tinned prosperity of 
our arduous, but very necessary work. 

I have the honor, respectfully, to submit this report. 

T. D* S. Tucker. 

INSTITUTE FOB BLIND AND DEAF MUTES. 

This noble school for these afflicted and unfortunate 
youths, located near the city of St. Augustine, is entirely sup- 
ported by the appropriations annually made by the legisla- 
ture. It is one of the greatest blessings resulting from the 
liberal system of education Florida is affording her youtb. 

Fifty of these unfortunate children of both races and 
sexes are receiving an education now at this institution. 

Tuition, board and clothing are furnished free of charge 
by the State ; the course of instruction given is as near that 
of the public schools as possible in the literary department, 
while carpentry and cabinet work, printing and truck gar- 
dening are taught the seeing boys, and house work, needle 
work and other work adapted to the seeing girls ; the blind 
are taught mu.-ic. bead work, and it is designed to Wach them 
also basket and broom making. A neat little paper is now 
printed and regularly issued by the pupils of the institute 
under the direction of their foreman, who is also a deaf mute. 
It is hoped that by the school census now in process of being 
taken of all youth of the school age that the post office ad- 
dress of all parents and guardians of blind or deaf mute chil- 
dren will be obtained, so that the proper parties may place 
themselves in' correspondence with them or vian them, and 
induce them to send their afflicted children to the school that 
they may enjuy this great privilege and in some part be com- 
pensated fur the deprivation of their senses. The faculty, un- 
der the lead of Prof. Wm. A. Caldwell, area devoted, admira- 
bly qualified band of sympathetic workers and the value of 
their influence with these nfllicted children of the State can 
only be measured by Him who knoweth all things. 

The following from Prof. Caldwell will give further in- 
formation : 

St. Augustine, Fla., December 31, 1891. 

To the Son. A. J, Russell, Stute Superintendent of Public In- 
struction, ex-officio Secretary of the Board of Managers of 
the Florida Institute for the Deaf and the Blind. 

Sir— Id accordance with custom, I present herewith a state- 
ment of this school's progress during the past year. The ses- 
sion closed last June with thirty-seven pupils in attendance, 

2 



/ 



IS 

twenty-four in the white department and thirteen in the col- 
ored. There had been four others in attendance during the 
session, but they were called home by the sickness of rela- 
tives or from other causes before the close of the term. These 
with the new pupils who have entered this term, make the to- 
tal number forty-nine enrolled during the year 1891. I re- 
gret to say that seven of these pupils, present last term, have 
not retorned. Two of the seven were not expected back, one 
being over twenty -one and the other having been dismissed. 
The remaining five should be here under instruction and I 
have also been disappointed by the non-appearance of several 
new pupils, whose parents had promised to send them. It is 
but natural that the father and mother of an afflicted child 
should cherish an especial affection for that one, and should 
dread separation from it. And yet to us, who look ahead to 
mature years of that deaf or blind child and think of the time 
when he must face the world alune, ihe act of refusing them 
an education seems but little short of criminal. A parent 
who would cut off his child's arm or otherwise maim him 
physically, would be regarded with horror by the public ; yet 
the neglect of having a deaf or blind child educated, is an 
even greater cruelty to him than mere physical injury would 
be. It must be admitted that there is a kind of aversion to 
schools of this kind, and it is directly traceable to the nnfor- 
tunate nime of "asylum," which was adopted by the flr«4 in- 
stitutions for the deaf established in America. The men who 
were active in founding these schools soon foresaw the mis- 
apprehension which was certain to arise from the use of that 
title, and hastened to correct it, so far as lay within their 
power. But the name has gone into popular usage ai^l wi*] 
probably continue there. As a consequence schools for the 
deaf and the blird are associated in the public mind, with lu- 
natic asylums, homes for the idiotic and reformatory institu- 
tions, and it is hard indeed to make some understand that our 
work is simply and purely educational. 

The pupils enrolled d uring the year are from the follow- 
ing counties : Alachua, 1 ; Brevard, 3 ; Duval, 1 ; Escambia, 
1 ; Gadsden, 1 ; Hamilton, 1 ; Jackson, 4 ; Jefferson, 1 : Lake, 
I ; Levy,l ; Marion, 10 ; Madison, 1 ; Nassau, 2 ; Orange, 1 ; 
Pasco 2 ; Polk,. 1 ; St. Johns, 3 ; Suwannee, I ; Washington, 
] ; total, 49. 

Fifteen of these were colored and thirty-four white : nine 
blind, and forty-one deaf, one boy being both deaf and blind. 
Miss McMillan resigned her position as teacher of articu- 
lation last year at the close of the term, much to my surprise. 
She had been a faithful teacher and was greatly loved by her 
pupils. On* teaching force was quite limited in numbers last 



r\ 



19 

year, owing to the small appropriation, but the provision 
made by the legislature has enabled us to add to our number 
of instructors and to do much more effective work tban was 
possible last year. It is generally agreed among teachers of 
the deaf that every child should be afforded an opportunity to 
learn to speak," and this is one aim of this school. It is not 
in my opinion less important to admit that all deaf children 
cannot profitably be taught by the oral method. Impressed 
with these truths, I have arranged our work in the depart- 
ment for the deaf as follows : Half of the daily session, the 
white pupils are under the instruction of Mrs. Rosa Kceler, an 
experienced and successful teacher of articulation, during the 
same time the pupils of the colored department are being 
taught the use of language by the manual (or so called sign) 
system, by Miss Oakley Bockie, a lady who has had no previ- 
ous experience, in teaching the deaf, but who filled the posi- 
tion! of assistant matron last year, and made good use of the 
opportunity thus afforded of acquainting herself with the work 
of manual instruction. After recess each day, these ladies 
exchange places, and by this means every chM has daily 
training in speech and yet does not have to depena upon that 
as his only way of securing an education. In addition to 
this, there is one class of small children in the white depart- 
ment who remain during the entire session in charge of their 
teacher, Miss Olive Hart, a lady who comes to us highly re- 
commended from the Rochester fchool. 

Miss Sims continues in charge of the blind pupils, alter- 
nating from one department to the other — not a desirable 
method, but the number of blind children is so small as not at 
present to justify the employment of more than one teacher. 

In the industrial department, type-setting and printing 
have been introduced, and under the instruction of Mr. John 
Finnerty, our boys are making excellent progress in the 
"art preservative." Instruction also continues in the car- 
penter shop and the photographic rooms. During the past 
year, many improvements have been made on the buildings 
and about the grounds. The health of pupils and officers 
has been excellent, there having been almost no sickness dur- 
ing the entire year. While this exemption from disease is 
doubtless due in part to the regular life led at the institute, 
still it is equally certain that much of it is to be credited to 
the healthful ness of this locality. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WSI. A. CiXDWELL, 

Principal. 



&0 



A BEJOEMATORY SCHOOL, 



n 



To complete our excellent system of public education, 
we seed now only a Reformatory School, with farm and shops 
as well as the books, into which the tainted and vicious youth 
of our cities, towus and villages may be placed, and while be- 
ing educated bo trained also morally that they may leave tbe 
school prepared to enter upon a good useful citizenship. Snch 
a school would be in the interest of true economy in that it 
would relieve the public treasury greatly of that most horri- 
ble expense of tbe jails and State prison, from which rarely 
ever comes any other return but hardened criminals and 
abandoned hope, bat to return to prison for deeper and more 
dreadful crime. 

TEACHEES' INSTITUTES. 

Exceedingly profitable and improving Teachers' Insti- 
tutes and Summer Normal Schools have been held during the 
school year, and immediately after the closing of the schools, 
in most cases. 

These have been organized and conducted by the County 
Boards of Public Instruction and the County Superintendents; 
competent instructors have been selected and employed and 
the result has been patent in the work of the school a from 
the beginning of tbe present school year. The progress and 
advance of these counties in which these Institutes have been 
held is indisputable evidence of the benefit resulting from 
them, and proof that they should be held in every county 
every year, or in groups of counties contiguous to each other. 

These counties holding them as reported to this office 
are : Escambia, Holmes, Washington, Jefferson, Suwannee, 
Columbia, Bradford, Alachua, both for white and negro 
teachers separate, Marion, Volusia, Putnam, Orange, Polk, 
Manatee, Lafayette and Levy. Length of term ranging from 
two weeks to two months. 

ARBOR OAT, JANUARY 8, 1891. 

In obedience to your proclamation setting apart the 8th 
day of January, the anniversary of the battle of New Orleans, 
under Gen. Andrew Jackson (" Old Hickory "), I issued a cir- 
cular letter to each county superintendent urging a hearty 
participation in the exercises of the day by all the schools, 
and prepared and sent out a programme of exercises as such, 
suggestive of the order and lessons of the day. 

I have received reports from fifteen counties ; doubtless 
many other counties observed the day but their superinten- 
dents overlooked the matter of reporting. These report 2T6 



21 

schools participating, number of pupils 8,924, number of pa- 
trons present 1,943, number of trees planted 2,711. The State 
institutions engaging in the exercises of the day were the 
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College, the State Nor- 
mal College at DeFuniak Springs, the State Normal and 
Industrial College for Negro Students. One of the bappieBt 
results of Arbor Day in Florida is the beautiful rows of 
thrifty oaks and stately magnolias which now adorn and 
beautifully shade the campus of the Agricultural and Mechan- 
ical College at Lake City. The people, school officers, teach- 
ers and pupils are pleased with the day, its usefulness and 
exercises. 

TABLES. 

For detailed information, financial, statistical and other- 
wise, 1 refer yon to the tables at the close, which, compared 
with the report for 1889-90 up to September 30, will at once 
show you the material growth and increase of the whole 

system. 

CONCLUSION. 

I cannot refrain from again addressing to Tour Excel- 
lency my sincere thanks for the warm sympathy and support 
so generously given me in my arduous and responsible work, 
and heartily congratulate j t ou upon the prosperity, growth 
and improvement of the public school system of Florida dur- 
ing your administration. 

ALBERT J. RUSSELL, 
State Superintendent Public Instruction, 



REGULATIONS 

Prepared by the State Superintendent or Public 

Instruction and Adopted ^y the State 

Board or Education. 



OFFICERS. 

Regulation' 1, — Qualifications. — Persons, to be eligi- 
ble to appointment to offices in his department must be 
well endorsed as possessing, substantially, the following 
qualifications: 

"They are personally known to us as citizens of good 
moral character, upright, responsible, possessing a fair 
education, and desirous of extending the benefits of free pub- 
lie instruction to all classes of youth. As officers, they will 
be found competent, impartial and faithful in the performance 
of their duties. For these reasons we commeod them for ap- 
pointment." 

Regulation 2.— School Supervisors will be governed, 
in thf general management of their affairs, under the direc- 
tions of the Board of Public Instruction of the county. 

TIME OF ISSUING CERTIFICATES. 

Regulation 3. — Although a Board of Public Instruc- 
tion may examine teachers and grant certificates, at any time 
or authorize the County Superintendent to do so, which may 
continue in force in the county for one year from date, yet it 
may b^ found desirable to fix upon certain days and places at 
which this particular duty will be attended to. Certificates 
may be issued to expire within the year, to correspond with 
the times of holding the meetings. By such an arrangement, 
both the board and teachers would be accommodated. 

Ample notice should be given of all such meetings by 
the County Superintendents, so that every teacher, or person 
desirous of teaching, may have the opportunity of preparing 
for the examination. 

Regulation ±. — All applicants for First Class or State 
Certificates, must apply through. County. Superintendents, 
under whom they are employed, and have the endorsement of 
both the Superintendent and Chairman of the County Board 
of Public Instruction in every case. 

AU teachers applicants for examination with a view to 
obtaining certificates, must he examined in the School Laws 
of Florida in reference to State Board of Education, State 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, County Boards of Pub- 
lie Instruction, County Superintendents, and teacher's duties 
and authorities. 



24 

Examinations will be conducted at, or during, County 
Institutes as far as possible. 

RiGtTLAMON 5. — Teacher's Certificates of the First 
Class will be granted by the State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction to eminently successful teachers of the second 
class who, on examination, answer 85 per cent, of the questions 
submitted in the branches usually taught in high schools. 

Graduates of normal schools may receive First Class 
Certificates without examination, who hold diplomas from 
colleges of undoubted reputation and other colleges in which 
Pedagogics are taught. No exception will be made to this 
regulation except the State Superintendent shall have strong 
and satisfactory reasons for the same. 

Regulation 6. — Third and Second Class Certificates 
will be issued by the County Boards of Public Instruction 
based upon the following; 

Any person, to be considered a teacher in the meaning 
of the school law, or entitled to compensation for services or 
any of the privileges and immunities of a teacher, must, at the 
time of performing the services or claiming the immunities 
hold a teacher's certificate unimpaired by suspension, revoca- 
tion or limitation. 

Eligirilht. — A candidate for teaching, to be eligible 
to an examination, must produce satisfactory evidence of 
being of Btrictly temperate habits and maintaining a good 
moral character. 

And— 

1st. To be able to read intelligently from any school 
reader in common use, and properly teach the same. 

2d. To spell correctly the words of any ordinary 
sentence. 

3d. To be able to write well and teach the same. 

4th. To Bolve readily the questions involving the rules 
of arithmetic, to square root, and to explain the principles on 
which their solution depends. 

5th. To have a general knowledge of geography; as the 
location and boundaries of continents ; the relative positions 
of the principle countries, oceans, seas, and rivers ; the 
boundaries and capitals of the United States and of several 
States and Territories, and tne counties and rivers of Florida 

6th. To have a general knowledge of the history of the 
"United States and of the State of Florida 

7th, To have a good practical knowledge of school 
organizations, classification, management and discipline, and 
of the arts of interesting youth and imparting instrnction. 

Rule. — No certificate will be issued to applicants who, on 
examination, fail to answer 75 per cent, of the questions 



25 

submitted in the above branches for a Third Class Certificate. 
The following for a Second Class Certificate: 
Second Class. — In addition to the foregoing qualifications 
a candidate for a Second Class Certificate must, on examina- 
tion, be able — 

1. To read with ease and accuracy. ^ 

2. To write a plain, free hand, and teach the same, 
S. To apell correctly. 

4. To solve readily the questions in any practical arith- 
metic in common use. 

5. To have a good knowledge of geography. 

6. To be familiar with the English Grammar, so as to ap- 
ply its principles correctly in composing, spelling and puncu- 
ating a letter, or an ordinary sentence. 

T. To have a good knowledge of the outlines of general 
history, and especially that of the United States and of Flor- 
ida. 

8. To be acquainted with the elements of book keeping. 

9. To understand and be able to explain the principles 
which underlie the branches taught. 

10. To understand well the proper organization, classifi- 
cation, management and discipline of a school, the improved 
methods of teaching, and possess good sell-control. 

No applicant will be awarded a certificate, who, on exam- 
ination, fails to answer 80 per cent, of the questions pro- 
posed in the above branches. 

Regulation 7. — The State Board of Education are 
deeply impressed with the fact that the large majority of the 
children in attendance upon the public schools are the chil- 
dren of the poorer people, and will fill the large and impor- 
tant classes of farmers, workmen, mechanics and artisans of 
the State, and that to impart to them only the knowledge to 
be derived from the school books, excellent and necessary as 
it is, will but illy equip them for the sphere of life to which 
in Providence and circumstances they are very sure to be 
called, and are still more impressed with the necessity of im- 
parting to them some knowledge (to the boys especially) of 
the useful and necessary tools and implements used in the arts 
and trades, and to the girls some training in sewing, cookery 
and housewifery in general by simple illustrative lectures or 
talks upon their use, and the general principles involved, so 
that a taste may be cultivated for these very useful and im- 
portant vocations in life, and pome knowledge imparted of 
them, but mainly to impress them with a true and proper con- 
ception of the honor and dignity of honest labor. County 
Superintendents and Boards of Public Instruction are urgently 



16 

and specially called upon to give their earnest attention to 
this very important feature of school work and instruction. 

Regulation 8. — The evil of intemperance abroad in the 
land demands the attention uf all true men and women every- 
where, that its tide may be turned back, and the great social 
evil abated, therefore the State Board of Education call upon 
all County Superintendents and County Boards of Public In- 
struction to see that the pupils are from time to time, as the 
regular work and duties of the school will, permit, Impressed 
with the evils flowing from the use of intoxicants and nar- 
cotics morally, physically, socially and financially, so that a 
wholesome conception of the evil and ruin wrought by them 
may be had by every pupil. 

Regulation 9.— As the spirit of the school law clearly 
intends to prevent entanglement at all possible by contract- 
ing or bargaining among members of the County Boards of 
Public Instruction, therefore the State Board of Education 
would most earnestly admonish all members of these Boards 
to entirely refrain from the employment ot persons in any 
manner who are Dearly allied to them by the ties of relation- 
ship, specially of a close nature, and would especially suggest 
to those who in the past have been thus situated to free them- 
selves at once of the entanglement, and that in the future no 
one will be recommended for appointment in any relation in 
the school work who contemplates such employment. 

A very considerable part of the dissatisfaction which does 
exist in some school neighborhoods is created by this condi- 
tion of affairs, and the general cause of educaiion in the State 
must be relieved of it. 

Regulation 10. — All Loacbers should of their mvn pur- 
pose seek from time to time to advance the i-lass of their cer- 
tificates by diligent- and persistent study and the constant 
reading of the hest journals of school work, and books treat- 
ing methods, discipline and government of the school*, and 
so pass from the lowest to the highest grade of cirtificate, and 
carry with it the increase <1 capacity for the true work of the 
school room. 

County Superintendents discovering a disposition on the 
part of certain leathers to remain content with any certificate 
they may be fortunate enough to obtain, exhibiting no desire 
to rise higher or to become better qualified for their impor- 
tant work, should at once report the same to the Board of 
Public Insttuction and recommend their removal from the 
corps of teachers in the county. 

The authority for making these Regulations will be found 
in the School Law Pamphlet, pages 7 and 8, section 13, clauses 
5th and 11th. 



27 







Table No. 1 










COUNTIES. 


I 

s 


g 

i 


J, 

°A 

■— o 

■-'/- 
Sis 


s **> 

3.2 

£ 8 


verage Attend- 
ance, including 
alt Colors. 


umbor of White 
Children En- 
rolled. 


umber of Col- 
ored Children 

Enrolled. 


Ad 

OS 
u ^ 
m — 

= I 

s --■ 




£ 


fc 


41 


L- 


< 


A 


ft 


4. 


Alachua 


101 


60 


5650 


3128 


3654 


3127 


132 




36 


31 


5 


1054 


702 


822 


232 


36 




50 


41 


9 


1865 


2350 


414 


1942 


60 




39 


34 


5 


700 


522 


590 


110 


44 




27 


20 


7 


601 


411 


457 


144 


27 


Clay 


53 

69 


45 
44 


8 

25 


1329 

3080 


777 
2170 


1047 
1552 


•JN'J 

1528 


55 


Columbia. 


77 




33 


30 


3 


507 


426 


523 


75 


34 


Dade 


6 
81 


6 

48 


33 


114 

4265 


80 
3114 


114 
1922 


3344 


6 




135 


DeSoto 


51 


50 


1 


1726 


WW 


1714 


12 


52 




55 


35 


30 


3532 


2408., . 


, 2078 


1454 


81 


Franklin ..... 


6 


3 


3 


573 


385. 25 1 


^819 


254 


13 




68 


40 


38 


2063 


1S55 


1171 


1791 


72 


Hamilton 


65 


45 


20 


2068 


1086 


1381 


687 


70 




37 


19 


8 


739 


466 


480 


240 


21 


Hillsborough . 


78 


69 


9 


2901 


1892 


2515 


446 


89 




41 


40 


1 


1330 


84d 


1810 


20 


44 




83 


50 


as 


4466 


2635-09 


3086 


2377: 85 


Jefferson 


65 


30 


35 


3971 


2347 


1063 


2909 79 




43 


42 


1 


1028 


718 


1038 


.... 41 


59 
54 
15 


25 
41 


84 
13 

6 


3681 
1709 

385 


2159 

1040 

245 


569 

1101 
216 


3112 67 




607 BO 




169 IS 




17 
02 


ie 

51 


i! 


898 

ITS:'. 


216 
1185 


277 
1879 


16, 17 




4(1 1 


Madison 


80 


44 


36 


3590 


27 


1455 


2144! 22 


Manatee ..... 


33 


87 


1 


88Q 


718 


840 


40; 40 


Marion 


112 


74 


3S 


5002 


sins 


2326 


86761 184 




10 


8 


2 


1456 


816 


719 


787 28 


•Nassau 


58 


#41 


*17 


•2120 


•1831 


10,54 


857 69 


Orange 


84 


68 


lti 


seas 


1624 


1817 


8091 99 




33 


37 


6 


739 


4124 


Mfl 


83 88 


Polk 


78 


71 


7 


•2468 


1565.47 


2334 


134 


89 




73 


49 


24 


2fl30 


1655 


1485 


1145 


86 




35 


33 


3 


1117 


729 


1085 


88 


30 


St. Johns 


33 


26 


7 


1354 


1042 


864 


490 


51 


Santa Rosa. . . 


77 


66 


11 


2529 


1808 


lS'.tl 


038 


50 


Sumter.. 


39 


30 


9 


1499 


1012 


1057 


442 


51 




t;s 


49 


24 


3032 


1842 


1780 


1252 


78 


Tavlor 


33 


32 


1 


815 


543 


767 


49 


22 


voiusar", 

Wakulla.^ 


m 


48 


15 


1971 


2175 


1355 


616 


70 


28 


18 


10 


816 


463 


509 


307 


27 


Walton 


57 


50 


7 


1692 


1076 


1492 


200 


54 


Washington... 


61 


53 


9 


1813 


1052 


1420 


393 
37342 


58 


Totals 


2348 


1747 


601 


94019 


63004.81 


56677 


2641 



•Token from Report of lB'JU, 



28 



Table No. 3. 



Jfi 



laa, 



NAME 
OP COUNTY. 



Baker 

Bradford 

Brevard 

Calhoun . , , 

Clay . 

Colombia,,,. 

Citrai 

Dade 

Duval 

DeSoto 

Escambia 

Franklin 

tiadjHitin 

Hamilton . . . . 
Hernando . . . , 
HHlBboronsh 

Holmes 

Jackson 



Lafayette . 
Lake 



Levy 

LitKrty.. 
Madison. 



Manon 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Orange . 

Osceola 

Faaco 

Polk 

Putnam 

Saint Johns. 



Sumter 

Bnvrannoe . . . 

Taslor 

Volusia...... 

Wakulla.... 

Walton 

Washington . 

Totals 



% 4,393, MS !ffi 
836,875 00 
13,618 58 
1,444.989 00 
■ 485,74700 
1,440,158 00 
U87,OO00O 
1,160,840 21 

tjmm 

8,400.300 00 

tjmjaB so 

4^106,874 00 

«4B,70»06 

1,071.428 00 

L498,B»00 

89,440 00 

4,81 J. 844 33 

868,944 00 
1.S3JS 893 96 
1,883,994 00 

MQ,noot» 
3.820,923 00 
1,080,01 <0 00 
2,080,388 38 
1,499,92000 

390348 00 
1,45S,9400Q 
1,300,000 00 
5,333,229 &4 

2,811,62* 00 
1,982,820 38 

4488,20339 

1,489 ,090 00 
1,608,640 00 



•5 

•A 



3.312,145 00 
2,400,iK» 00 
1,249,940 00 
1,709.984 44 
1,654,993 08 

444,880 00 
4,180,490 00 

408.948 00 
1,057,881 60 
1,138,030 88, 



4 
4 
6 
I 
3 

*M 

4 

1 

3 
** 

6 
3 

e 

J* 
6* 

:> 

i* 

i 
e 

4 
4 
■I 

s 

■-» 

$ 

I 
I 

8 
4 
I 

4 

Sf 

*Z 

<4 

5 



28,638 07 
8,080 00 
8,135*9 
8.11184 
1,447 94 
9,808 44 

12,819 40 

ijm a 

3,159 98 

20,68317 




21,278 90 

Mn jo 

4,643 87 

4,998 27 

5.402 19 

33,810 88 

4,130 43 

8,938 88 

11,391 B7 

4,438 31 

23,244 88 

4,800 00 

3,937 95 

8,340 27 

1,370 40 

7,839 64 

3,868 12 

20,477 80 

10,481 98 

10,471 10 

31,488 80 

5,346 80 

8,273 48 

27,632 64 

lutom 

13.397 44 
8,07716 

11,589 72 
7,834 14 
tM U 

21,837 30: 
2,200 00' 
4,802 49' 
6.743 16; 



$ mm m 

324 88 
564 80 
368 63 
243 69 
483 33 
1,143 10 

am m 

28 79 
2,143 80 

828 87 
1,462 34 

180 44 
1,407 11 

736 43 

293 80 
MKM 

43244 

874 08 
2,003 03 

W N 

708 29 

93 22 

3,263 24 

497 67 
120 95 

1,15790 

498 09 
2,0J3 6U 
1,321 30 

S22 16 
848 45 
270 61) 
364 U 
798 86 
8)4 48 
83216 
728 34 
405 03 
609 78 
273 17 
543 SU 
22184 
37812 
856 94 



$ 8,017 20 1 
793 SO 

847 00 

832 10 

682 40 
1,132 80 
2,733 40 

608 8) 

n re 

=.1.31 00 
1,27120 .. 
8,014 70 

449 40 
3,34010 
1.78810 

488 30 

2.486 40 
1,02840 
2,095 10 .... 
4,778 10 

86880 .. 
1,701 70 . . 

M M 
5,30140 

U1S»M 

308 00 
2,792 30 

486 60 
4,848 80 
3,126 30 
1,97100 

s,os3 ix) 

889 X 

884 80 

1,916 80 

1,929 90 

1,497 30 

LT4B 30 

982 10 

1.487 n 
SM M] 

1.310 40 
547 40, 
913 60' 

848 00; 



a" 



7.— B 
■jao 

Is* 



22,775 00 
2,490 00 

11.280 00 

5,900 00 

806 00 

9,170 00 

10.1CO 00. 
1,991 00 : 
5,000 00 

52,100 00 



3 



II 



30,998 00 
8,740 00 
TJU) 01 

18,646 00 
7,100 00 
17,000 00 



IJBIM 



4,300 00 
17,710 00 
4,370 00 
995 00 
8,680 00 
4,300 00 

mjm on 

17,400 00 

17,00 I 00 

i;>,!i*. H 
4,650 00 

12,475 00 

30,244 00 
9,940 00 

23,84100 

3,100 00 

8,400 00 

MM B I 

780 00 

*>.431 10 

300 00 

3,488 00 

6,470 00 



188,898.910 44' 189% |46',334 48 l 888,928 93 l $79,9B6 00't 409,947 10 $90,300 83 



I 6.380 00 

800 00 

2,740 00 

800 08 

"iTaoo'oo 

2,310 00 
468 00 

asm 

6,394 00 
412 74 

mm m 

1,200 00 
850 00 

3,380 00 
475 00 

3,640 00 

ioooo 
'i5»'6ii 

8160 

' JU035 66 
2,480 00 
1,040 Of i 
900 00 
1,175 00 
1.310 00 
4,634 00 
2,060 00 
L80OO0 

sftMf tO 

m n 

1,703 88 
3,400 00 
1,120 04 
1,895 20 
100 00 
1,230 00 
2,485 00 

8,213 88 

"260 '66 
726 00 



29 



Table No. 3. 



NAME 
OF OOXTHTT. 


£ 

3 

F m 

la 

a R 


9 
"3, 

<-. 9 
o a, 

h * 

a ! 


i 

i 

is 


I 

9 

it 

eg 

£ a 

OS"" 


■390 


t 

M 
8 

3 

a 
,2 ■ 

r? g 

a 




1,288 

480 

1,087 

am 

235 


1,162 
392 
915 

304 
388 


$ 39,417 84 
3,440 00 
9,388 50 
5,857 50 
8,842 00 

5.020 25 
7,886 50 

11,388 75 

',410 00 

8,402 27 

34,045 60 

19,979 41 

2,130 00 

8.021 00 
6,971 13 
4,675 00 

23,711 50 
4,166 00 
9,967 On 

12,691 25 
4,415 50 

18,565 15 
500 00 

10,300 00 
1,618 00 
1.128 00 
8,729 00 
1,184 56 

83,573 50 

11,63171 

11,777 25 

35,035 16 
6,147 oe 
5,912 00 
3,147 30 

17,733 25 
9,884 50 
9,587 85 
1.500 00 
8,540 97 
2,940 00 

17,391 33 
3,520 00 
5,495 00 
5,420 00 


$ 1,800 00 
200 00 
430 00 
600 00 
350 00 
360 00 
430 00 
540 00 
60 00 
516 64 

1.300 00 
900 00 
75 00 
600 00 
480 00 
450 00 

1,300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
730 00 
240 00 

1,080 00 
300 00 

1,020 00 
600 00 
150 00 
774 00 
.500 00 
960 00 
4'U 00 
630 00 

1,800 00 
600 00 
600 00 

1,000 00 
900 00 
600 00 
900 00 
690 00 
600 00 
300 00 
870 66 
320 00 
215 60 
480 00 


$179 60 

133 00 
145 00 
189 00 
2O0O0 
192 65 
20130 
130 50 

77 80 
231 00 
321 80 
300 00 

73 00 
213 80 
156 80 

70 00 
176 80 
136 65 
243 20 
27155 
283 00 
647 99 
128 60 

97 75 
170 40 
196 80 
173 40 

79 00 

262 80 

162 20 
373 30 
138 40 
132 00 
350 00 
1G0OO 
427 90 

149 80 
188 60 

263 30 

150 00 
303 30! 
155 20 
138 30 
15120 


$ 2,299 62 
30 00 


Brevnrd 


799 47 
936 80 




375 00 


Citrus .' 


879= 243 
525 582 

808! 7411 
631 51 

829! 833 


211 77 


Clay 


3,194 34 


DeSoto 


1,278 78 

46 80 

3.030 67 




7,085 16 


Gadsden. . „ 


1,047 
154 
58 i 
744 
150 

1.272 
677 


1,031 
175 
604 
037 
216 

1,243 
633 

1,007 


1,239 74 

1,860 00 

495 37 

653 07 


Holmes 


592 70 
1,734 71 

30 40 




411 61 

2,048 37 




576 

B77 
181 

395 
587 
131 
687 


452 
076 
145 
274 
515 
95 
768 


75 00 
384 33 


Madison 


761 24 
75 80 

349 31 
23 60 

927 62 




398i 442 

1,214! 1,112 

335^ 384 

553| 500 


335 03 




1,250 10 
4,303 07 


Nassau 


1,383 29 




915 


903 


1,256 93 




735 35 


Polk 


546 
1,323 
757 
433 
979 
634 
949 
395 
713 
240 
835 
753 


542 
1,118 

738 
439 
912 
503 
831 
372 
643 
260 
657 
.668 


270 48 
445 00 


Putnam 


33 85 




1,883 78 


Santa Rosa 


nss n 

29 12 


Suwannee 

Tavlor 


313 31 
300 00 




1,182 38 


Washington 


130 1 
430 05 
997 80 




M.M6 


24.911 


$482,464 47 


{26,531 30 


$8,357 85! 


$43,859 57 



30 





Tahls No. 4. 








SAME 
OP COUXTY. 


fi 

ill 


2 
u 

e 3 

s* 
M 


£ 

fc 3. 

o 

•= £ 

= 9 


o 

9 

m 

■ ° 

55 


| 

O m 

§1 




4 


2,871 
107 
HI 

67 
39 

148 
708 


2,779 

135 

199 

48 

77 

30 

134 

820 


59 


73 




5 31 


Rri.iforci 




10 50 






3 42 




i 


4 18 


Clay 


3 31 

!) 46 


Dade 


2 

2 


27 


50 
*9 


DeSoto 


8 


4 


1 
55 
26 

5 

29 
20 


51 




80 




10 

a 

i 

4 


637 
108 
S93 
08 
105 
202 
10 
1,210 


767 
140 
BM 
349 
144 
244 
10 
1.167 


55 

7 

43 

50 




9 


21 




3 
3 


11 

1 

31 


41 




54 




2 
2 
2 
2 


39 








41 


209 

8 

1,403 

310 

87 

1,025 

18 

1,343 

841 

408 

397 

a 

16 

70 

548 

236 

398 
806 
606 

25 
277 
160 

90 
183 


196 

8 

1,649 

297 

88 

1,119 

22 

1,484 

396 

451 

412 

13 

as 

597 
264 
340 
336 
646 
24 
339 
166 
110 
210 


12 
1 

33 

14 
6 

39 
1 

*8 
8 

22 

21 
2 
2 

29 

13 

9 

13 

26 

1 

17 
9 
4 
9 


00 
16 




34 


Levy i 


42 

9 




6 


40 




39 


Marion _ 


1 


86 
20 






45 




10 


78 
26 


Paseo 


7 


37 


Polk 


89 




1 

4 

11 

15 
7 


57 




38 
51 




40 




52 




23 
58 




18 




10 


87 
49 








Totals f" 


130 


16,992 


17,039 


ess 


1,956 









•Taken from Report of 1*90. 



•Tale county Tailed to report. 



31 



Table No. 5.— Census of School Population, 1888. 




V 



Alacana . 

Baker 

Bradford . . . 

Brevard 

Calhoim ..... 

Clay 

Columbia ... 

CUras 

Dade 

Duval 

DeSoto .... 

Escambia 

Franklin ., 

Gadsden 

Hamilton 

Hernando,. , 

Hillsborough 

Holme* ... . 

•Jacfcson 

Jelftrsnn . . . 

UTayattc 

Leon 

Levy 

Liberty 

Let 

Lake 

Madison 

Manacct 

Marion 

Monroe 

Nassau 

Orange.. '..... 

OaccoU 

Polk ... 

Putnam ... _ 

Pasco 

St. Johns 

Santa Rosa... 

Sumter 

Suwannee 

Taylor 

Volusia 

Wakulla 

Walton 

Washington. . 



:±: 



8,763 

1,MB 

2.145 

1,117 

m 

1,881 
4.401 

T4i- 

140 

8,039 

a,o*a 

5.808 
It* 
S.OSll 
2,848' 
SB 
+,014 
L.MS 
a,TOH 

7,7i»: 

1.480 
9.G08 

i.so? 

374 

2,648 

4.441 
TO 

7,«46 

8,430 1 

u* 

864 1 
2,850 
-.■.'4" 
1,311 
4.445 
■JM 
1,442 
2,385 
1,073 
1,873 

871 
1,500 
1,3*) 



Totals I ]29,U2 



1.098 
1,101' 

1.886; 
87 J I 

m' 

1.574 

ajm 

689 

101 
7,300 
1.186 
4,081! 

912 
4,613; 
2,493 

171 
3,622 
1,432 
2,863! 
8,783' 
1,208 
7,872 
1 ,888 

4H- 
316 
2,40i: 
3,059: 
(MS 
6,884 
4,470 

8,870 

017 1 
2.706 
2.727 
1,2%) 

z,\m 

UN 

1,373 
2,087 

1,842 

752 

1,276 

1,210 



4,468 


4,318. 


883 


682j 


1,138 


!,'*« 


»24 


tB8 


w 


mt 


SOS 


m 


2.342 


2,082. 


441 


308' 


77 


42 : 


4.104 


3,834 


l. ( ,HH 


055 


g,Ma 


2,022 


m 


391 


1 828 


2,889 


1,474 


1.372 


415 


406 


2,142 
862 


1,882' 
700 


1,844 


1,761 


4, M] 


s,«ts 


82* 


ess 


4,ati 


4,397 


I (107 


890 


•}- 


218 



208 
1.MS 

3,286 

372 

3,878, 

2,111 ' 

:- 
1,682 

491 i 
1,502 
1. 400 1 

767 1 
1,036 ' 
1,601 

to 

1,251 
690: 

1 .''24 



819 

71.-. 



L2WB, 
2.165 1 

sag 

3,885: 

-: us 

1,664 

1,450 

595] 

1,078 1 

1.301 i 

657 1 

1,084 

183 

MS 

362 
887 

624 



958: 

i.as* 

2.-11 

677 

114 

3.213 

2,018 

3,254 

488 f 

1,6021 

1,787 

671 

;.■■.'■'■ 

1.5N6 

1,958. 

1.430. 

1,4121 

8t2! 

1 4M0 

283! 

387' 
2,025 
|,8M 

662 
3,380 
3,141 

1 . '.' It 

' 

2.847 
1,117 
1,200 
1,410 
2,17" 
1,019 
1,408 
LOS] 
1,504 
558 
1,2*8 
1,120 



113,817 65,812' 63,300 1 68.514 60,5081 83 



8, 87 

■JST 

sua 

129 

217 

802 

2,088 

72 

6 

4,821 

26 

2,8U 

m 

3,480 

1,050 

250 

810 1 

H 

1,749 1 

8,289 

88 

8,166 

B37 

■226 

17 

6ii 

2,:i7( 

401 

4,472 

1.338 

l.HOt! 

783 

75 

288 

MSB 

12 

609 

738 

433 

839 

89 

468 

315 

241 

n - 



1 



» 

to 

8 

B8 

72 



124 

307 
103 
71 
324 
763 



2 

163 

7 

92 

33 

73 
37 

7 
04 

31, 

108 

43 

861 
1*8 : 

■sl 

• 

51 
r-J 
1 
211 
81 
:;l 
10 

U 
81 

45 

:.; 

27 

n 

5 

81 
H 

at 

lu 



st 84B8 OJtltt 



u 

1,240 
■218 

750 
180 

1 1 

aw 
u 

753 

148 
458 
366 
775 
235 

45 

45 
337" 
488 

N 

1,088 

755 

448 

221 

98 
174 

3T 

as 

. 133 
40 
68 
402 
234 
IBS 
105 

-834 



") 



82 



SUPERINTENDENTS OF COMMON SCHOOLS. 



COUNTY. 



Alachua 

Baker 

Bradford 

Brevard 

Calhoun 

Citrus 

Clay 

Columbia 

Dade 

DeSoso 

Duval 

Escambia 

Frnnklin 

Gadsden 

Hamilton 

Hernando. 

Hillsborough , . , 

Holmes. , 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Lafayette 

Lake 

Lee 

Leon.. 

Levy v. 

Liberty 

Madison 

Manatee 

Marion 

Monroe. ....... 

Nassau. 

Orange 

Osce«la 

Pasco 

Polk 

Putnam -, 

St. Johns.... ... 

Santa Rosa . 

Sumter 

Suwannee 

Taylor 

Volusia. ....... 

Wakulla 

Walton 

"Washington 



NAME, 



F06TOFFICB. 



W. N. SHEATB 

G.R. Blaik ,..'. . 

Joseph L. Hill.! . . . 

JohitH. Sams 

J, H. McClellas. . . 

£. A. Harbison 

E E. Rankin 

E, G. Persons 

John Clewinson . . . 

H. E Carletoh 

Joel D Mead 

N. B. Cook- 

Wm. T. Mableb 

O. E. L Allison 

Geo. J. Graham , 

Dk J. R. Temple. . . 
L W. Buchhql?..-.. 
WniTMiLL Cubht. . , 
Wm. M. Fabbior. .. 

J. A Walker 

Zachariar Jones-- 
John C Compton... 

D. 0. Kaktz. 

N. W Eppes 

S helton Phillips.. 

T. J. Gbegoby 

R. L. Williams 

E. M. Graham 

Marion L. Payne... . 

C. P. Kemp 

H. L. .Mattaib.,,., 

John. T. Beees 

C. A. Cabson 

R. M. Ray 

8. S. N 1 117 . A (" k 

Ai.tcv Strapz 

Peter Abmatj. 

Geo. W. Cpbtis. .., 
C. Whitfield 

A W. MlZELL 

John R Kelly 

K. 6 C. Pebeibs 

R. B. Pi.RBES 

James Russell 

L L Charles 



Gainesville. 

Saudersnu. 

Lake Butler. 

Courtney. 

Blountstown. 

Le canto. 

Green Cove Springs, 

Port White. 

Jupiter. 

Poit Green. 

Jacksonville. 

Pensacola. 

Apalachicola. 

SJuincy. 
en uings. 
Brocksville. 
Bloomingdale. 
Izagora. 
Campbellton. 
Aucilla. 
McCrabPO 
Tavares. 
Port Myers 
Tallahassee. 
BroQEOU. 
Bristol. 
Madison. 
Braidentown. 
Ocata. 
Key West. 
Bryceville. 
Orlando . 
Kissimmee. 
Dade Ciiy. 
Lakeland. 
Palitka. 
St. Augustine. 
Milt-n. 
SumterviBe. 
Welbom. 
Spring Warrior, 
DeLand. 
Craw ford vi lie. 
Freeport. 
Vernon. 



1 



\ 



,